88 days diaries: Shock and tears

During my travels I’ve met lots of different people. I’ve come across some situations where I felt like I was being pushed around. Somehow people think they can treat you like shit because you are a traveller. I find it hard to deal with this, but sometimes you’ve got to stand up and find out what’s going on. Situations are often delicate and your actions might not have the effect you were after…Here’s a piece of my diary when I was working on a farm in order to get a second year visa.

It took me a while to get the courage, but finally I stepped into the office of the farm to ask if I could stay until the beginning of January. This way I would certainly get my 88 days in, without having to look for another farm. After all, my days in Australia were ticking away fast and I needed to secure my second year. I’d been in the dark long enough. I wanted answers. Suddenly I got a rant from my boss. It all depended on how helpful I’d be and apparently I wasn’t helpful enough.

Hello? Whose cat do I feed every day? Whose bins do I put on the street every week? Whose backpacker accommodation have I cleaned in my free time? Whose plants do I water outside of work hours? Are you kidding me?

All of this wasn’t enough. No… I had to ask the men more often if they wanted coffee. I had to babysit even though nobody had ever asked me to do that. I had to keep everything clean and clean the toilets. And all of this outside of work hours. Oh please! I want to shoot the dickhead, the old-fashioned prick. Working your ass off for a meagre salary of $400 a week isn’t enough? You have to dedicate your whole life to the farm.

I know I shouldn’t take things personally and that he is full of shit, but this time it hit me. I’d been working so hard. I already did extra things, which I didn’t mind doing until now. He was suggesting I was lazy, slacking and not doing my job. But my job ends at 4PM. All the things I did after that were extras and they were not even appreciated. I felt like shit. Nobody should ever be treated like this.

If you want to stay in Australia for a second year working holiday, you’ll have to do your 88 days of regional work. In the 88 days diaries I tell the story of my three months of farm work on a cherry orchard. I worked out in the fields as a farm hand before working in the packing shed during the cherry season. Read about what I think, experience and explore, from eccentric farmers to new skills.

So looking like a shabby ghost buster isn't enough? Who're you going to call?

So looking like a shabby ghost buster isn’t enough? Who’re you going to call?

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3 thoughts on “88 days diaries: Shock and tears

  1. well my husband had a boss tell him something similar – well it was much different than your scenario – but it was like a check-in and the message was similar – implying more needed to be done and the whole slcker accusation was the final straw for my spouse – we were already toying with an exit and this was the last straw for him!! And you know, the great thing about experiences like this is that it makes you appreciate good leadership even more when you are under it. and well, keep that in mind with your seasoning during your travels (and 88 days that were noted in that diary – which I need to skim more stuff from – I do!) but keep in mind that all that seasoning has much value for you down the road – very much – even if it is just to appreciate what many take for granted. 🙂 even though you probably already know that.
    ~y.

    • Thanks for the great comment. This period at the farm was indeed a period of learning and making very personal choices. Where are the lines? What can you tolerate and what not? How to stand up for yourself? I chose to finish and am happy I did. Everything’s got value in some way and see this period as personal development and reflection.

      • good for yo for finishing! and well said – especially this “Everything’s got value in some way” – have a nice day! ~y.

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